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SmartTots and IARS News, Press Releases and Events

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SmartTots – Perspectives from the Front Lines

Millions of children undergo surgery annually. Recent studies suggest there may be reason for concern. This video, featuring Dr. Dean Andropoulos, Dr. Peter Davis, and Dr. Caleb Ing, provides a summary as to why research is needed and the type that is needed.

SmartTots to Help Make Anesthetics and Sedatives Safer for Children

Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at the Food and Drug Administration, and Dr. Michael Roizen, of the International Anesthesia Research Society, unveil a new partnership that aims to make anesthesia safer for children.

Pediatric Anesthesia Questions and Myths-Mayo Clinic

Dr. Randall Flick at Mayo Clinic “debunks myths” and answers common questions raised by parents in regard to anesthesia.

Sirtuin 2 Inhibition Attenuates Sevoflurane-Induced Learning and Memory Deficits in Developing Rats via Modulating Microglial Activation

Sevoflurane is a widely used inhalational anesthetic in pediatric medicine that has been reported to have deleterious effects on the developing brain. Strategies to mitigate these detrimental effects are lacking. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2) is a member of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent protein deacetylases involved in a wide range of pathophysiological processes.

Paeonol attenuates isoflurane anesthesia-induced hippocampal neurotoxicity via modulation of JNK/ERK/P38MAPK pathway and regulates histone acetylation in neonatal rat.

Volatile anesthetic such as isoflurane causes widespread neurodegeneration in the developing animal brains and also induces cognitive impairments. Paeonol is a plant-derived phenolic compound possessing numerous bioactive properties. The study investigates the neuroprotective effects of paeonol against isoflurane-induced neurodegeneration and cognitive disturbances in neonatal rats.

Neurodevelopmental Effect of General Anesthesia on the Pediatric Patient.

In this article, the authors review the animal and human data on the recent studies looking at the neurotoxicity of general anesthesia in the pediatric population. Animal studies in rodents and non-human primates demonstrate neurotoxic effects when exposed to general anesthesia at a young age. However, prospective clinical studies in humans do not show significant differences in intelligence quotient outcomes in children younger than 3 years with isolated and/or short exposures.

Does general anesthesia affect neurodevelopment in infants and children?

General anesthesia has been unequivocally linked to abnormal development of the central nervous system, leading to neurocognitive impairments in laboratory models. In vitro and in vivo studies have consistently shown that exposure to GABA agonists (eg, volatile anesthetics, midazolam, and propofol) or NMDA antagonists (eg, ketamine, isoflurane, and nitrous oxide) produces dose dependent and developmental age dependent effects on various neuronal transmission systems.